Investigation Sequence

Title

Bubbles

Written by:

Cindy Cech and Cristi Holtapp                 Date

 

Focus Questions

What is a bubble? How many different types of bubbles exist?

Concepts

Content: Earth, Physical, & Life

A bubble is a thin film of liquid surrounding air or a thin film of air surrounding liquid. There are three basic types of bubbles and three other types that are not very familiar.

Cross cutting concepts

unifiedproceessconcepts

Science Practice

inquiryconcepts

Personal, Social, Technology, Nature of Science, History

otherconcepts

Background information

The three basic types of bubbles are pockets of air under water, air trapped under a water film, and bubbles that float in the air. An antibubble is the opposite of a soap bubble. There are three types of antibubbles, which are a falling droplet of water, "water globule" on the surface, and anitbubble, which floats underwater. additionalinfo

Activity Sequence

1. Bubbles in air
2. Bubbles under the water
3. Bubbles on the water surface
4. Falling droplet of water
5. "Water Globule" on the surface
6. "Antibubble" floats underwater

Activity Descriptions

Activity 1
Bubbles in air
Materials
Bubbles
Procedure
1. Ask students what will happen to the bubbles after they are blown around the room.
2. Ask students what the bubbles are made of.
3. Ask students how the bubbles keep the same shape.
4. Have students blow bubbles in to the air and observe what happens to the bubbles, think about what the bubbles are made of, and think how they keep their shape during the activity.
5. Ask students to share their observations with the class and reach a conclusion about the observations, such as bubbles are air with a thick liquid of air around them.


Activity 2
Bubbles under the water
Materials
Bucket of water, glass
Procedure
1. Ask students what will happen if they submerge a glass underwater with the rim down.
2. Ask students what will happen if they tip the glass.
3. Have the students submerge a glass of water in a bucket with the rim down and observe what happens.
4. Have the class discuss the results and reach a conclusion.
5. Have the students tip the glass that is submerged in the water and observe what happens.
6. Have the students compare their observations.
7. Ask students what the bubbles are made of, what the different shapes are, and what causes the shapes.

Activity 3
Bubbles on the water surface
Materials
Bubbles, bucket of water
Procedure
1. Ask students what will happen to the bubbles if they blow them over a bucket of water.
2. Have students blow bubbles over a bucket of water and observe what happens.
3. Ask students if their predictions were correct.
4. Ask students to discuss the results and describe what they think happened.
5. Ask students what the bubbles are made of.


Activity 4
Falling droplet of water
Materials
Eyedropper, water, glass
Procedure
1. Ask students what will happen if they let a droplet of water fall from an eyedropper.
2. Ask students what the droplet of water is created from and how it is created.
3. Have the students use an eyedropper to let a droplet of water fall into a glass.
4. Ask students what they now think the droplet is made of and how it was made.
5. Ask students if what they saw could be compared to anything they have seen in the previous activities.


Activity 5
"Water Globule" on the surface
Materials
Glass of water, eyedropper, water
Procedure
1. Ask students what will happen if they let a droplet of water fall from an eyedropper into a glass with water.
2. Have students to use an eyedropper to let a droplet of water fall into a glass of water.
3. Ask the class what happened when the droplet hit the water.
4. Ask students if this activity compares to any activities previously done and what the droplet is made of.


Activity 6
"Antibubble" floats underwater
Materials
Sink, large clean jar, clean and empty squeeze bottle (such as an empty Elmer’s glue bottle), and dish washing detergent
Procedure
1. Ask students if there is anyway to create a bubble of water inside a container of water.
2. Ask students what the bubble is made of.
3. Have students place a jar in a sink so that water can continuously flow into the jar, allowing the jar to overflow.
4. Have students add soap to the jar of water, stir well, and fill the squeeze bottle with some of the soapy water.
5. Have students place the tip of the squeeze bottle near the water surface. Tell the students to give a gentle puff to create one droplet and then immediately give a longer squeeze.
6. Ask students what they observed happening.
7. Ask students which activity this is similar to.

Dr. Robert Sweetland's notes