Assessment Tasks for Fraction

Fraction as equal parts of a whole: Give a sheet of paper with a series of shapes some cut into equal parts and some not. Ask students to describe how the shapes are cut (super). If students don’t comment on the portion size of each piece, ask them questions about the size of each part (close or not yet).

Fraction values

Fraction value with area models: Give students a variety of pattern blocks or Cuisenaire rods (see chart below) and ask them to show 1/2, 1/3, 2/3, 3/4, and 1 1/2 (super - see rubric). If students can’t complete the task on their own, prompt them by giving them a block to use as the value of one and ask if they can show the fractional part of it. (1/2, 1/3, 2/3, 3/4, and 1 1/2) (close or not yet - see rubric).

Fractions with length or measurement models: Give students a ruler and ask them to show you 1/2, 3/4, and 3/8 of an inch (super). If they can not then prompt them by showing them 1/8, 1/4, and 1/2, then ask them to show you 3/4, 3/8 and 1/2 (close or not yet).

Fractions as subsets of a set: Give students a collection of 10 objects and ask them to show you 1/2, 2/5, 3/10 (super). If they can’t prompt them by dividing into two groups and asking what is 1/2. Five groups and ask what is 2/3. And spread the ten out and ask what is 3/10 (close or not yet).

Fraction

Rods

Pattern Blocks

1/2

Red and white,
Red an purple,
Yellow and orange,
Light green and dark green,

Yellow hexagon and red trapezoid,
Or blue parallelogram and red trapezoid

1/3

Light green and blue,
Or white and light green,
Or red and dark green

Red trapezoid and green triangles,
Or yellow hexagon and blue parallelogram

2/3

Light green and blue,
Or white and light green,
Or red and dark green,

Red trapezoid and green triangles,
Or yellow hexagon and blue parallelogram

1 and 1/2

Red and white,
Red and purple,
Yellow and orange,
Light green and dark green,

Yellow hexagon and red trapezoid,
Blue parallelogram and red trapezoid

Equivalent Fractions

Recognizes equivalent fractions: Give the student a fraction wheel and ask them to explain what the parts are worth. Ask them if they could use it to show equivalent fractions (super). If they can’t prompt them by showing them that the inside circle is 1/4, then ask them if that helps them know what the middle section and outer section is. Then ask what that has to do with equivalent fractions (close or not yet).

Can change fractions to different equivalent forms: Show students a ratio table and ask how it could be used with fractions (super). If students can’t tell them that the first column looks like 1/2, then ask if that suggests a relationship to the next columns (close or not yet).

Can change fractions to different equivalent forms Give students a sheet of dot paper with 3x7 array of 21 dots in a rectangle so 12 squares could be made. Ask if they could show 1/3, 2/6, and 4/12 and if they are related (super). If they can’t suggest that they draw lines to make squares (close or not yet).

Can compare fractions as equal, greater, or less: Ask students how they would arrange 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, and 2/3 in order and how they know they are right (super). No prompt here if students can’t then rate them not yet.

Value of ones 1/3 what is one? Next give them a red and ask if this is 1/5 what is one (All right with out hesitation super, some hesitation close, errors not yet).

Add and subtract fractions of equal parts:

A city block is about 1/12 of a mile. Chris walks three blocks to store, two blocks to the post office and five blocks back home. Home much of a mile did Chris walk?

Dr. Robert Sweetland's Notes ©