Third Grade Mathematics Curriculum (Updated fall 2006)

National Council Teachers of Mathematics Standard

Nebraksa Standards Competency or Indicator

Teacher created concept, objective, outcome, competency

Curriculum investigations, units, chapters, modules...

Activities

Evaluation Levels

Numeration/Number Sense

4.1 Numeration/Number Sense

       
 

4.1.1 demonstrate place value of whole numbers through the millions and decimals to the hundredth place.

       
 

Read and write numerals (in digits and words) through the millions place and decimals to the hundredth place.

Count and write numerals

to 10,000

Mathematical Thinking at Grade 3 Assessment Master 6

1. Counts and groups quantities to make 100 (Mathematical Thinking)

2. Demonstrates familiarity with number patterns on the 100 chart (Mathematical Thinking)

3. Uses a variety of materials, including the calculator, as tools for solving problems (Mathematical Thinking)

4. Uses grouping to count (Mathematical Thinking)

5. Constructs symmetrical patterns (Mathematical Thinking)

6. Knows the addition combinations from 1 + 1 through 10 + 10 (Mathematical Thinking)

7. Uses numerical strategies to combine and compare quantities (Mathematical Thinking)

8. Can mentally add or subtract 10 or 20 to or from a number (Mathematical Thinking)

9. Has explored which numbers can be divided evenly (Mathematical Thinking)

10. Knows coin values and can count a set of coins (Mathematical Thinking)

11. Sorts and classifies information (Mathematical Thinking)

12. Collects, records, and represents data (Mathematical Thinking)

13. Demonstrates an understanding of the characteristics of odd and even numbers and how they behave when combined (Mathematical Thinking)

14. Is developing an understanding of the relationship between halves and wholes (Mathematical Thinking)

15. Is developing an understanding of the decimal point and its meaning (Mathematical Thinking)

16. Using factors of 100 to understand the structure of 1000

17. Estimating quantities up to 1000.

18. Using landmarks to calculate distances within 1000.

Use numbers from the hundreds chart and describe them in tens and ones.

" Order Up" game from 100 Activities for the Hundred Number Board, page

 

 

Order and compare whole numbers through the millions place and decimals to the hundredth place using the symbols <, >, and =.

Ordinal Numbers

Identify ordinal numbers to the fifteenth place

Round numbers to 100’s

 

Have the students stand in a line and discuss who is first, sixth, etc. Continue to do this activity until the students have a good understanding of the concept.

Use a red, blue, green, yellow, black, brown, white, orangeÉ Unifix cubes or a paper chain. Create a pattern, give the first two sequences of the pattern by telling the ordinal position of each cube (green first, yellow second, black third; green fourth, yellow fifth, black sixthÉ) for a string of cubes. Have students that think they know the pattern tell the next sequence (green seventh, yellow eighth, black ninth). Continue until all students know the pattern.

Use a number line several hundreds charts.

and explain rounding by asking the children if 14 is closer to 10 or 20. Do several examples. After the students understand rounding to ten introduce rounding to hundred.

 

.

4.1.2 write and illustrate equivalencies of whole numbers in expanded form, decimals, and fractions

Recognize expanded notation and illustrate with numbers.

Equalities

Compare numbers to 10,000 using >,<, or =

Recognize the division sign Ł

 

Select a base ten model (base ten blocks, dots, lines, squares, cubesÉ), a numbers from 0 - 1000, and represent it with a model. Share the model with other students. Have the students determine the value of the model and write it in expanded notation. Don't always show the models in order from small to largest or largest to smallest.

The models can also be used to write the next three, one hundred more, ten less,É

 

 

Whole numbers in expanded form

Write numbers in expanded form, such as 432 = 400 + 30 + 2.

       
 

Fractional numbers in expanded form

Represent equivalent fractions with denominators of 2, 4, 5, 8 and 10 (1/2 = 2/4) using concrete objects.

Collect, construct, and interpret data for tables, charts, and graphs.

Order and compare common fractions

Recognize the fraction equalities with >,<, or =

Add and subtract like fractions

1.      Sorting and classifying information. (Mathamatical Thinking)

2.      Collecting, recording, and representing data (Mathamatical Thinking)

3.      Describing data presented in tallies and graphs (Mathamatical Thinking)

4.      Using groups to count tallies or objects (Mathamatical Thinking)

5.      Developing strategies to combine and compare quantities (Mathamatical Thinking)

Fold paper into parts. Ask students to color parts of their paper. Ex: color 1/4th, color 2/3rds, etc. Tape papers on the board and have students discuss how they know each is colored and labeled accurately. Have the students put < > = between the displayed papers, discuss, rearrange, and insert equalities again, repeat as desired.

Write the fraction for each paper and use the sign, >, <, or =, to compare the fraction.

 

.

Compare fractions using <, >, and = for like and unlike denominators

 

1.      Realize fractional pasrts must be equal (Fair Shares)

2.      Develop familiarity with conventional fraction words and notation (Fair Shares)

3.      Becoming familiar with grouping unit fractions, those that have a numerator of 1 (Fair Shares)

4.      Develop familiarity with common equivalent fractions especially relationships among halves, thirds, and sixths (Fair Share)

5.      Understand that what occurs between 0 and 1 also occurs between 1 and 2 and between any consecutive whole numbers ( ½ + 1/6 = 2/3, 2 ½ + 1/6 = 2 2/3 (Fair Shares)

6.      Understand relationship between fractions and division (Fair Shares)

7.      Relating notation for common fractions with notation for decimals on calcuator (Fair Shares)

8.      Use different notations for same problem (Fair Shares)

   
 

Decimal numbers in expanded form

Recognize the tenths place of decimals

 

Use fractions to demonstrate items being divided into ten (1 divided by 10 (1/10) equals .1 and there are 10 dimes in one dollar. Continue with the values of dimes to a dollar ( .10 = 1/10th of a dollar, .20 = 2/10th of a dollar, .30É.).

Select a random number of dimes, write the number of dimes, the fractional amount, and decimal.

 

 

Write equivalent decimals (.4 = .40).

       
 

Write decimals as fractions using denominators of 10 and 100 (.68 = 68/100).

       
 

4.1.3 will describe and apply relationships between whole numbers, decimals, and fractions by order, comparison, and operation.

     

.

 

Illustrate mathematical concepts by using objects and drawing pictures or diagrams (subtraction as the opposite of addition and multiplication as repeated addition).

       
 

Order and compare whole numbers, common fractions, and decimals using the symbols <, >, and =.

Recognize counting patterns of 2’s and 5’s

Round numbers to 100’s

Compare numbers to 10,000 using >,<, or =

 

On a hundred chart color multiples of 3 red, and multiples of 4 blue.

Repeat with a new grid for 2 multiples, 5 and 6.

Repeat with a 99 chart for multiples

Fill in the missing numbers on a number grid starting with a number above 10,000.

 

 

Use input/output or function box to identify and extend patterns.

       
           
 

Use input/output or function box to identify and extend patterns.

       
 

Solve and check a mathematical problem by using the related facts.

       
 

4.1.4 identify examples of positive and negative numbers and zero.

Read the temperature on a thermometer using Fahrenheit scale.

Identify existence of a centigrade scale.

Demonstrate positive and negative numbers using a thermometer.

Up and Down the Number Line

1. Finds net change given starting and ending numbers (Up and Down the Number Line)

2. Uses subtraction to cancel addition (Up and Down the Number Line)

3. Makes the same net change in many different ways using positive and negative numbers (Up and Down the Number Line)

4. Uses net change to determine an endpoint instead of counting each change separately (Up and Down the Number Line)

5. Has a strategy for adding a long sequence of changes (Up and Down the Number Line)

6. Has a strategy for finding a missing starting number or a previous position along the number line (Up and Down the Number Line)

7. Represents numbers graphically and understands that a “going up” graph indicates positive change, a “going down” graph indicates negative change, and a horizontal graph indicates zero change (Up and Down the Number Line)

8. Finds net change on a graph (Up and Down the Number Line)

9. Recognizes that passage of time and order of events can be represented by moving from left to right (Up and Down the Number Line)

10. Moves to the left for negative changes and to the right for positive changes (Up and Down the Number Line)

11. Can halve and double numbers (Up and Down the Number Line)

   
 

Demonstrate simple concepts of positive and negative numbers (a thermometer for temperature or distances to the right or left of zero on a number line).

       
 

4.1.5 make change and count out in amounts up to $20.00.

Count change up to $20.00

1.      Review coin values and finding the values of collections of coins (Mathamatical Thinking)

2.      Developing familiarity with the factors of 100, an important landmark in our number system and their relationship to 100 through work with coins. (Landmarks in the Hundreds)

   
 

Count back change from purchase price to amount given using fewest coins possible

Add and subtract money up to $20.00

     
 

Calculate change through subtraction and choose correct bills and coins to make this amount.

       
 

4.2 Computation/Estimation

       
 

4.2.1 estimate, add, subtract, multiply, and divide whole numbers without and with calculators and solve word problems.

Add and subtract four digit numerals with / without regrouping up to 9.999

Memorize addition and subtraction facts to 20

Memorize multiplication facts to 6

Identify multiplication facts to 10

Multiply 2 digit numbers by 1 digit number

Memorize division facts up to a divisor of 6

Identify division facts to 10

Identify the remainder in division

Divide 1 and 2 digit numbers with a 1 digit number

Combining and Comparing Assessment Master 37

1. Uses landmark numbers in combining and comparing quantities (Combining and Comparing)

2. Examines how the parts and the whole are related to addition and subtraction (Combining and Comparing)

3. Solves addition problems that have multiple addends (Combining and Comparing)

4. Has more than one way to solve a computation problem and uses one method to check another (Combining and Comparing)

5. Solves combining and comparing problems with numerical strategies and records solutions using standard addition and subtraction notation (Combining and Comparing)

6. Is comfortable combining and comparing 3-digit numbers and totals to 1000 (Combining and Comparing)

7. Makes comparisons of how things change over time (Combining and Comparing)

8. Can weigh with a pan balance (Combining and Comparing)

9. Understands and uses important equivalencies of time, money, and linear measurement (Combining and Comparing)

10. Estimates solutions and can adjust to construct an exact solution (Combining and Comparing)

11. Reads and writes numbers in the hundreds and thousands (Combining and Comparing)

12. Collects, represents, describes, and interprets data (Combining and Comparing)

13. Uses the calendar as a tool for problem solving (Combining and Comparing)

14. Has a numerical strategy for solving problems that involve both addition and subtraction (Combining and Comparing)

   
 

Demonstrate with accuracy and reasonable speed the basic facts of addition (1-20), subtraction (1-20), multiplication (1-144), and division (1-44).

   

Create a story problem and solution using multiplication. (If there are 5 pudding packages with 4 pudding cups in each one, how many pudding cups are there?) and share problems.

Solve multiplication and division problems using Multilink cubes and arrays.

Create a story problem and solution using multiplication. (If there are 5 pudding packages with 4 pudding cups in each one, how many pudding cups are there?) and share problems.

Solve multiplication and division problems using Multilink cubes and arrays.

 

 

Add and subtract accurately five-digit numbers including columns of numbers.

       
     

Landmarks in the Hundreds Assessment Master 27

1. Understands the relationship between skip counting and grouping (Landmarks in the Hundreds)

2. Is familiar with the relationships among commonly used factors and their multiples (Landmarks in the Hundreds)

3. Demonstrates increasing fluency in counting by single-digit numbers and by useful two-digit numbers, such as multiples of 10 and 25 (Landmarks in the Hundreds)

4. Knows the factors of 100 (Landmarks in the Hundreds)

5. Uses knowledge of the factors of 100 to understand the structure of multiples of 100 (Landmarks in the Hundreds)

6. Uses knowledge of the factors of 100 to understand the structure of multiples of 1000 (Landmarks in the Hundreds)

7. Uses knowledge of factors and multiples to solve multiplicat6ion and division problems (Landmarks in the Hundreds)

8. Can read and use standard multiplication notation to record solutions (Landmarks in the Hundreds)

9. Estimates quantities up to 1000 (Landmarks in the Hundreds)

10. Uses landmark numbers to calculate “distances” within 1000 (e.g., how far is it from 650 to 950?) (Landmarks in the Hundreds)

11. Creates numerical expressions that equal a given number  (Landmarks in the Hundreds)

   
 

Multiply up to a three-digit number by a two-digit number.

 

Things that come in Groups Assessment Master 12

1. Can find things that come in groups (Things that come in Groups)

2. Understands that the operation of multiplication is adding equal groups (Things that come in Groups)

3. Can write and illustrate multiplication sentences (Things that come in Groups)

4. Recognizes that skip counting represents multiples of the same number and has a connection to multiplication (Things that come in Groups)

5. Can find patterns in the multiples of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, and 12 by using the 100 chart and the calculator (Things that come in Groups)

6. Recognizes that multiplication can be used to find the total of an array (Things that come in Groups)

7. Can find factors of numbers using factor pairs (Things that come in Groups)

8. Demonstrates understanding of the relationship between multiplication and division (Things that come in Groups)

9. Can identify whether word problems can be solved using multiplication and/or division (Things that come in Groups)

10. Can use multiplication and/or division notation to write number sentences (Things that come in Groups)

11. Can use patterns to solve multiplication and division problems (Things that come in Groups)

   
 

Divide up to a three-digit number by a one-digit divisor.

       
 

Choose correct operation and solve word problems.

       
 

4.2.2 estimate, add, and subtract decimals without and with calculators and solve word problems.

     

.

 

Add and subtract decimals to the hundredth place.

Our competency with decimals states

Recognize the tenths place of decimals (3.13)

Order and compare common fractions

Recognize fraction equalitities with >,<, or =

Fair Shares Assessment Master 46

1. Knows that fractional parts must be equal (e.g., one-third is not just one of three parts but one of three equal parts) (Fair Shares )

2. Has developed familiarity with conventional fraction words and notation (Fair Shares )

3. Can group unit fractions that have a numerator of 1 (for example: 1/6 +1/6 + 1/6 is equivalent to 3/6) (Fair Shares )

4. Knows common equivalents, especially relationships among halves, thirds, and sixths (for example, exchanges 2/6 for 1/3; begins to make exchanges based on 1/6 + 1/3 = ½) (Fair Shares )

5. Understands that the relationships that occur between 0 and 1 also occur between any consecutive whole numbers (e.g., ½ + 1/6 = 2/3, so 2 ½ +1/6 = 2 2/3) (Fair Shares )

6. Understands the relationships between fractions and division (e.g., by solving problems in which the whole is a number of things rather than a single thing, and the fractional part is a group of things as well, as in 1/3 of 6 is 2) (Fair Shares )

7. Relates notation for common fractions (1/2, ¼, ¾, 1/5, 1/10) to notation for decimals on the calculator (0.5, 0.25, 0.75, 0.2, 0.1) (Fair Shares )

8. Uses different notations for the same problem (e.g., 6/2 and ½ of 6) (Fair Shares )

 

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4.2.3 estimate, add, and subtract fractions with like denominators without calculators and solve word problems.

 Add and subtract like fractions

     
 

Solve problems involving fractions of halves, fourths, and eighths using the operations of addition and subtraction.

       

Measurement

Measurement 4.3

       
 

4.3.1 estimate, measure, and solve word problems using metric units for linear measure, area, mass/weight, capacity, and temperature.

       
 

Use the appropriate units of measurement.

Identify units of measurements such as a yard and meter

Measure objects to nearest ½ in. and cm.

Identify liquid amounts such as quart and liter

Identify lb. And oz. As weight measurements

Identify perimeter of a shape in inches and centimeters

Identify area of a shape in inches and centimeters

From Paces to Feet Assessment Master 22

1. Uses a nonstandard unit to measure a distance From Paces to Feet)

2. Estimates length in paces by visualizing the unit pace repeated over a distance From Paces to Feet)

3. Compares the effects of measurement using units of different sizes; understands that a smaller unit will result in a larger number of units used From Paces to Feet)

4. Describes the shape of the data and analyzes it for patterns From Paces to Feet)

5. Examines a set of data to determine which pace is the middle-sized pace From Paces to Feet)

6. Demonstrates understanding of the rationale for a standard unit of measurement From Paces to Feet)

7. Measures length in inches, feet, and yards From Paces to Feet)

8. Measures length in centimeters and meters; understands how big these units of measure are From Paces to Feet)

9. Represents data involving measurement on a line plot and describes the general features of the data From Paces to Feet)

10. Uses standard measures in complex situations to gather and analyze data concerning size and proportion From Paces to Feet)

11. Can estimate solutions to computation problems and use mental strategies to find an answer From Paces to Feet)

12. Can describe a visual image of a geometric shape From Paces to Feet)

   
 

Estimate and accurately measure length to the nearest meter or centimeter and calculate area.

       
 

Estimate and accurately measure mass/weight to the nearest gram.

       
 

Estimate and accurately measure capacity to the nearest milliliter.

   

You are asked to create a container that makes people think there is more in the container than there actually is. First collect a variety of containers that you think would cause this to happen and ones that would not (at least ten), put them in order according to their volume by sight, record the data, measure their volume, put them in order according to their actual volume, what shape of containers make people think there is more than there actually is?

 
 

Measure and read temperature accurately to the nearest degree using Celsius thermometer

       
 

4.3.2 estimate, measure, and solve word problems using standard units for linear measure, area, mass/weight, capacity, and temperature.

   

Measure the classroom and draw a scale map.Measure and map the school playground.

 
 

Use the appropriate units of measurement.

       
 

Estimate and accurately measure length to the nearest yard, foot, inch, and quarter inch and calculate area.

Measure perimeter in inches and centimeters.

 

Using one inch and one centimeter graph paper to draw different sized squares, measure the perimeter, chart the different perimeters, and determine how many of the following perimeters are possible (4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12)

 
 

Estimate and accurately measure mass/weight to the nearest ounce and pound.

Measure and compare lb. and oz. as weight measurements

the weights using < > = or ()

 

Using food package labels put them in order from lightest to heaviest. Measure sand or water in 4, 8, 12, and 16 ounces. Blind fold a partner and have them feel the containers (no shaking just lifting) and put them in order. How good are people at telling the difference in weight by feel?

Measure different items and tell how pounds and ounces compare.

 
 

Estimate and accurately measure capacity to the nearest fluid ounce.

Measure liquid amounts up to a gallon

 

Use water and solid substances to cups, pints, quarts, half gallon, gallon, and liter. Find how many of each fit into each of the others.

 
 

Measure and read temperature accurately to the nearest degree using Fahrenheit thermometer.

Read the temperature on a thermometer using the Fahrenheit and centigrade scale.

Solve problems with positive and negative numbers using a thermometer.

 

Use a weather site on the internet and select three different sites that have a wide range of temperature differences with above and below zero temperatures. Download the temperature readings for each site over a 24-hour period. Create three problems with solutions and share them with others.

 
 

4.3.3 tell and write correct time to the minute using an analog clock.

 

Combining and comparing book

Exploring number relationships and using important equivalencies in time.

Challenge students to make a clock that has hours 1-12 marked in the inner circle and minutes 1-60 on an outer circle. Have them use this to explain various ways of telling time.

Create and solve time problems with minutes before an hour and after the hour and duration problems.

 
 

Set an analog clock to a given time.

   

Planning a party page 35

 
 

State time in different ways (8:35, 35 minutes after 8:00 or 25 minutes until 9:00).

       
 

Identify time of day (AM, PM, noon, and midnight).

Recognize century, decade, and year.

 

Name of a community member or family member who, if living would be a century old, and those who are a decade old, and a year old.

 
       

Create a problem and solution about a person that buys a meal at store and pays with a pocketful of money - unknown assorted change and bills (about $20.00). Share problems and methods to count back change

 

Geometry

4.4 Geometry/Spatial

       
 

4.4.1 identify, describe, and create two and three dimensional geometric shapes.

Solve problems with geometric figures using congruence and similarity.

Match lines of symmetry (flips, turns, slides)

Create 2 and 3 dimensional shapes

Identify parallel and perpendicular lines

Create parallel and perpendicular lines

Exploring Solids and Boxes Assessment Master 51

1. Explores, sorts, and describes common geometric solids (Exploring Solids and Boxes)

2. Analyzes how solids are the same and different (Exploring Solids and Boxes)

3. Recognizes the components of polygons: sides and vertices (corners) (Exploring Solids and Boxes)

4. Recognizes how the components of polygons are put together from whole shapes (Exploring Solids and Boxes)

5. Recognizes the components of polyhedra: faces, vertices, and edges (Exploring Solids and Boxes)

6. Recognizes how the components of polyhedra are put together to from whole shapes (Exploring Solids and Boxes)

7. Has improved spatial visualization skills (Exploring Solids and Boxes)

8. Understands how a pattern for a rectangular box can be folded to make the box (Exploring Solids and Boxes)

9. Predicts and then determines the number of cubes that fit in a box by examining a pattern that can be used to make the box (Exploring Solids and Boxes)

10. Designs patterns for boxes that will hold given numbers of cubes (Exploring Solids and Boxes)

11. Understands the structures of a rectangular prism as arrays of cubes (Exploring Solids and Boxes)

12. Solves problems involving planning, trial-and-error processing, analysis, and visualization (Exploring Solids and Boxes)

13. Uses appropriate computation techniques to determine the total number of cubes that will fit in different boxes (Exploring Solids and Boxes)

14. Based on a sample, can categorize events as likely or unlikely (Exploring Solids and Boxes)

Students can create dimensional shapes using staws.

Find two and three-dimensional shapes around the room. List the object, the shape(s), and distinguishing properties.

 

     

Turtle Paths Assessment Master 41

1. Understands paths as representations or records of movement (Turtle Paths)

2. Describe a path using mathematical ideas and language (for example: closed, corner) (Turtle Paths)

3. Uses Geo-Logo commands to construct paths and describes the properties of paths (Turtle Paths)

4. Understands turns as changes in orientation or heading (Turtle Paths)

5. Estimates and measures turns (creating, using, and iterating [repeating] units of turns) (Turtle Paths)

6. Is familiar with a common measurement for turns-degrees-and understands that there are 360 degrees in one full turn, 180 degrees in a half-turn, and 90 degrees in a quarter-turn (Turtle Paths)

7. Defines and recognizes a triangle as a closed figure having three straight sides and three corners (Turtle Paths)

8. Identifies properties of equilateral triangles: the sides are equal in length and the turns (angles) are equal in measure (Turtle Paths)

9. Uses Geo-Logo commands to draw equilateral triangles, estimating turn measures and using trial-and-error strategies (Turtle Paths)

10. Can use mathematical processes, such as quantitative reasoning, mental arithmetic, and logic, to find missing measures of figures (Turtle Paths)

11. Constructs geometric figures that satisfy given criteria, using analysis of geometric situation, arithmetic, and problem-solving strategies (Turtle Paths)

12. Compares and connects drawn paths to Geo-Logo commands that created them to describe, analyze, and understand geometric figures (Turtle Paths)

13. Understands that shapes can be reoriented in space without losing their properties (Turtle Paths)

14. Estimates and measures the perimeters of various figures (Turtle Paths)

   
 

4.4.2 identify and draw points, lines, line segments, rays, and angles.

Identify and create parallel and perpendicular lines

Match lines of symmetry

 

Define a point, line, ray, line segment, and angle and give examples.

List examples for each geometric term.

Create parallel and perpendicular lines. Draw perpendicular and parallel lines on the board. Explain what they are called. Find parallel lines and perpendicular lines throughout the classroom (lines in the bricks, on shelves,É)

 

     

Flips, Turns, and Area Assessment Master 17

1. Measures area by covering a flat surface with square units (Flips, Turns, and Area)

2. Finds patterns for covering a space (Flips, Turns, and Area)

3. Compares areas of rectangles that have different dimensions (Flips, Turns, and Area)

4. Describes physical motions precisely as a series of slides, flips, and turns (Flips, Turns, and Area)

5. Compares the area of two shapes by determining whether they cover the same amount of flat space (Flips, Turns, and Area)

6. Compares shapes to determine congruence through motions such as rotations (turns) and reflections (flips) (Flips, Turns, and Area)

7. Explores relationships among shapes (for example, a rectangle can be cut into two triangles, each of which is half the area of a rectangle) (Flips, Turns, and Area)

8. Finds the areas of complex shapes by identifying smaller units of area, such as square units and half units (Flips, Turns, and Area)

9. Finds alternative ways to arrive at the same numerical solution (Flips, Turns, and Area)

   
 

4.4.3 By the end of fourth grade, students will identify, analyze, and compare two-dimensional geometric figures using congruence, symmetry, similarity, and simple transformations.

Match lines of symmetry.

Match lines of symmetry with flips, turns, and slides.

Create 2 and 3 dimensional shapes

Solve problems with geometry figures using congruence and similarity

 

Use different types of paper (wall paper, construction paper, tracing paper.) and make congruent figures and similar figures.

Use graph paper and design two identical objects. Use the two shapes to demonstrate flips, turns, and slides.

Create a flip, turn, or slide problems and solution for a classmate to solve.

 

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Identify perimeter of a shape in inches and centimeters

Identify area of a shape in inches and centimeters

  Use centimeter and inch squared graph paper, draw squares on each sheet that are 1x1, 2x2, 3x3, 4x4, and 5x5, compare perimeter to area.

 

Data Analysis

4.5 Data Analysis, Probability, and Statistical Concepts

       
 

4.5.1 collect, organize, record, and interpret data and describe the findings.

Collect, construct, and interpret data for tables, charts, and graphs

1.      Compare two numbers and develop strategies for determining their difference (Combining and Comparing)

2.      Determine different between original and ending weights (Combining and Comparing)

Look at the animal data page 12 (Combining and Comparing)

Comparing weights page 24 (Combining and Comparing)

Comparing handfuld of beans page 42 (Combining and Comparing)

More handfuls page 48 (Combining and Comparing)

 

 

Collect, organize, and interpret data in line plots, tables, charts, and graphs (pie graphs, bar graphs, and pictographs).

       
 

Draw valid conclusions from displayed data.

       
 

Investigate and record patterns in a simple probability situation in an organized way.

       

Algebra

4.6 Algebraic Concepts

       
 

4.6.1 use and interpret variables and mathematical symbols to write and solve one-step equations.

Identify indicators of multiplication besides the X symbol.

1.      Collecing, displaying, and interpreting data (Combining and Comparing)

2.      Organizing and presenting data in tables and line plots (things in groups)

Calculating savings page 76 (Things in Groups)

Many many legs page 79 (Things in Groups)

Data tables and line plots page 83 (Things in Groups)

A riddle with 22 legs page 87 (Things in Groups)

 

 

Use letters, boxes, or other symbols to stand for any number, measured quantity, or object in simple situations to demonstrate the beginning concept of a variable and writing formulas.

       
 

Identify and use various indicators of multiplication (parentheses, x, *) and division (/, ÷).

       

Dr. Robert Sweetland's Notes ©