Types of accommodations

PRESENTATION ACCOMMODATIONS

VISUAL PRESENTATION ACCOMMODATIONS

Instruction

Assessment

Large Print

Large print editions of tests and instructional materials are required for some students with visual impairments. It is recommended that regular print materials be manipulated to reformat test items and enlarge or change the font as needed. all text and graphic materials- including labels and captions on pictures, diagrams, maps charts, exponential numbers, notes, and footnotes- must be presented in at least 18-point type for students who need large print. Students, working with their teachers, need to find an optimal print size and determine the smallest print that can still be read. (Copyright issues may need to be addressed).  It is important for the print to be clear, with high contrast between the color of the print and the color of the background. When using large-print classroom material, consider the weight, size, and awkwardness of books. Large-print books are now available that look very similar to the same books in standard print.

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Magnification Devices

Some students with visual impairments read regular print materials and enlarge the print by suing magnification devices. These include eyeglass-mounted magnifiers, free standing or handheld magnifiers, enlarged computer monitors, or computers with screen enlargement programs. Some students also use Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) to enlarge print and display printed material with various image enhancements on a screen.

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x

VISUAL PRESENTATION ACCOMMODATIONS

Instruction

Assessment

Sign Language

Sign language interpreters may be required for students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Sometimes an interpreter is only needed or allowed to sign instructions and to assist in communication. Some students may need all print materials interpreted while learning to read print. Interpreters need to be able to translate in the same method of sign language typically used by the student (e.g., American Sign Language, Cued Speech). Interpreters must not paraphrase, clarify, elaborate, or provide assistance with the meaning of words, intent of test questions, or responses to test items, Graphic materials may be described but should also be available in print or tactile formats. A standard video presentation of a test in sign language may be used to increase quality, consistency, pacing, and accuracy.

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x

Large Print

Large print editions of tests and instructional materials are required for some students with visual impairments. It is recommended that regular print materials be manipulated to reformat test items and enlarge or change the font as needed. all text and graphic materials- including labels and captions on pictures, diagrams, maps charts, exponential numbers, notes, and footnotes- must be presented in at least 18-point type for students who need large print. Students, working with their teachers, need to find an optimal print size and determine the smallest print that can still be read. (Copyright issues may need to be addressed).  It is important for the print to be clear, with high contrast between the color of the print and the color of the background. When using large-print classroom material, consider the weight, size, and awkwardness of books. Large-print books are now available that look very similar to the same books in standard print.

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x

Magnification Devices

Some students with visual impairments read regular print materials and enlarge the print by suing magnification devices. These include eyeglass-mounted magnifiers, free standing or handheld magnifiers, enlarged computer monitors, or computers with screen enlargement programs. Some students also use Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) to enlarge print and display printed material with various image enhancements on a screen.

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x

Sign Language

Sign language interpreters may be required for students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Sometimes an interpreter is only needed or allowed to sign instructions and to assist in communication. Some students may need all print materials interpreted while learning to read print. Interpreters need to be able to translate in the same method of sign language typically used by the student (e.g., American Sign Language, Cued Speech). Interpreters must not paraphrase, clarify, elaborate, or provide assistance with the meaning of words, intent of test questions, or responses to test items, Graphic materials may be described but should also be available in print or tactile formats. A standard video presentation of a test in sign language may be used to increase quality, consistency, pacing, and accuracy.

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x

Braille

Braille is a method of reading a raised-dot code with the fingertips. Not all students who are blind read Braille fluently or choose Braille as their primary mode of reading. Even if they use it as their primary mode of reading, Braille users should also build skills in using audiotape, compact discs, and speech synthesis. Decisions also need to be made about whether a student will use contracted or uncontracted Braille. Check to see if practice tests are available in Braille. Although still uncommon, Ňrefreshable Braille DisplaysÓ are electronic devices used to read and write text. The device is connected to a computer and produces Braille output on the Braille display. The Nemeth Braille Code is a system of Braille that makes it possible to convey technical expressions in a written medium to students who are blind or visually impaired. The Nemeth Braille Code contains numerous technical symbols that occur in mathematics and science.

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VISUAL PRESENTATION ACCOMMODATIONS

Instruction

Assessment

Tactile Graphics

Tactile graphic images provide graphic information through fingers instead of eyes. Graphic material (e.g., maps charts, graphs, diagrams, illustrations) is presented in a raised format (paper or thermoform). Tactile sensitivity (recognizing graphic images through touch) is less discriminating that visual reading, making many diagrams too complicated to understand without significant additional information. Additional information can be created through work descriptions.

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Human Reader

A qualified person may be provided to read orally to students who are unable to decode text visually. Readers should use even infection so that the student does not receive any cues by the way the information is read. It is important for readers to read test items/questions and text word for word exactly as written. Readers may not clarify, elaborate, or provide assistance to students. Readers need to be familiar with the terminology and symbols specific to the content. This is especially important for high school mathematics and science, Graphic materials may be described byt should also be made available in print or tactile formats. Readers must be provided to students on an individual basis- not to a group of students. A student should have the option of asking a reader to slow down or repeat text. This cannot occur when a person is reading to an entire group of students.

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Audiotape or Compact Disk

Written tests and instructional materials are prerecorded on an audio cassette or compact disk (CD) that a student accesses by listening. Classroom directions, assignments, and lectures could also be recorded. When taping lectures, students should sit near the front of the classroom, use a small microphone, and tape only parts of the class that can clearly be replayed (e.g., turn the tape recorder off during small group discussions). Advantages include ease of operation and low costs. The greatest difficulty with a audio cassette is rewinding if a student wants to repeat material. This is not as difficult with a CD that can be programmed. Audio versions of tests and other written materials need to be supplemented with a print or Braille version of the text so a student can have access to complicated graphic material. When using a two-sided cassette tape, students may need to be reminded to play the other. Spot check audio formats before use to make certain everything is working properly. Copyright issues may need to address. Audiotapes and CDs must be signed out, collected, and kept in a secure location

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Book on Tape

Books on Tape is a service provided by recordings for the Blind and Dyslexic for which students and school can apply. Students call a toll-free number to borrow textbooks for a specified period of time. A special tape player may also be needed.

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Human Reader

A qualified person may be provided to read orally to students who are unable to decode text visually. Readers should use even inflection so that the student does not receive any cues by the way the information is read. It is important for readers to read test items/questions and text word for word exactly as written. Readers may not clarify, elaborate, or provide assistance to students. Readers need to be familiar with the terminology and symbols specific to the content. This is especially important for high school mathematics and science. Graphic materials may be described but should also be made available in print or tactile formats. Readers must be provided to students on an individual basis-not to a group of students. A student should have the option of asking a reader to slow down or repeat text. This cannot occur when a person is reading to an entire group of students.

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VISUAL PRESENTATION ACCOMMODATIONS

Instruction

Assessment

Recorded Books

Recorded Books are produced on tape or CD and can be borrowed from libraries or purchased from bookstores. Many online bookstores also carry recorded books, making access even easier. Some of the tapes contain the full book and some are abridged (e.g., ReaderŐs Digest version). These tapes play on standard cassette or CD players. Tapes or CDs for children often include a book for following along. Students who can see print may want to obtain a print copy of a taped book to follow along

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Audio Amplification Devices

Some students may require audio amplification devices in addition to hearing aids to increase clarity. A teacher may use an amplification system when working with students in classroom situations that contain a great deal of ambient noise.

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Videotape and Descriptive Video

Many books have been made into movies, giving students a visual and auditory way to access literature. Videotapes are now often closed-captioned. Captions are visible when activated by a decoder. Built-in decoders are required on all 13-inch or larger television sets descriptive video is a descriptive narration of key visual elements, making television programs, gesture films, home videos, and other visual media accessible to people who are visually impaired. Key visual elements include actions, gestures, facial expressions, and scene changes. Inserted within the natural pauses in dialogue, audio descriptions of important visual details help to engage viewers with the story.

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Screen Reader

A screen reader is a computer application that converts text to synthesized speech or to Braille (read with an auxiliary Braille display). Computer literacy is essential for screen reader use. Screen reading software allows students to listen to text as it is displayed on a computer screen. Students can choose to listen to any text multiple times. Some products work by having a student lay a page on a scanner. When a student activates the machine, it reads the text aloud using an optical character recognition (OCR) system. Mathematics formulas are normally displayed on screen as graphics that cannot be read by a screen reader.

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Visual Cues

Students who are deaf or hard of hearing need visual cues in the classroom. Teachers should keep their faces visible to the class when speaking, pass out printed material before class, repeat questions asked by other students, and summarize classroom discussion.

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Notes, Outlines, and Instructions

Written notes may be taken by another student and copied. A teacher could provide a print copy of instructions and assignments. Students could also be given a detailed outline of the material to be covered during the class period and an outline of material to be covered (syllabus) at the beginning of each grading period.

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Talking Materials

Many classroom materials are now available with auditory components. These include calculators, ŇtalkingÓ clocks, thermometers, timers, and voltmeters.

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Additional ideas that may be helpful:

Provides students with math formula cards

Increase space between items on a page

Simplify language in directions

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X

One complete sentence per line in reading passages

Key words or phrases in directions highlighted

Read directions to the student and have student repeat directions

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X

Provide a language interpreter

Read multi-step directions in small portions

Provide clear copies of assignments and assessments

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X

Cues (arrows, stop signs) on answer forms

Templates to reduce visible print

Allow student quietly read aloud

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X

Provide useful strategies for decoding, vocabulary, or comprehension

   

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X

Response accommodations

DESCRIPTION OF RESPONSE ACCOMMODATIONS

Scribe

A scribe is someone who writes down what a student dictates by an assistive communication device, pointing, sign language, or speech. Much skill is involved in being a scribe, skill that requires extensive practice. A scribe may not edit or alter student work in any way and must record word for word exactly what the student has dictated, Scribes should request clarification from the student about the use of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling key words, and must allow the student to review and edit what the scribe has written. Individuals who serve as a scribe need to carefully prepare to assure they know the vocabulary involved and understand the boundaries of the assistance to be provided. The role of the scribe is to write only what is dictated, no more and no less.

Word Processor

A student types on a word processor. This option may increase a studentŐs independence and reduce the need for a trained scribe. Research has found that students who complete better work on computers than by handwriting are students how are very familiar with and have good keyboarding skills. Assistive technology that can be used for typing including customized keyboards, mouth or headstick or other pointing devices, sticky keys, touch screen, and trackball

Speech to Text

Speech-to-text conversion or voice recognition allows students to use their voices as input devices. Voice recognition may be used to dictate text into the computer or to give commands to the computer (e.g., opening application programs, pulling down menus, or saving work). Older voice recognition applications require each word to be separated by a distinct space. This allows the machine to determine where one word begins and the next stops. This style of dictation is called discrete speech. Continuous speech voice recognition allows students to dictate text fluently into the computer. These new applications can recognize speech at up to 160 words per minute. While these systems do give students system control, they are not yet hands free.

DESCRIPTION OF RESPONSE ACCOMMODATIONS

Brailler

A brailler is a Braille keyboard used for typing Braille that can then be printed in standard print or Braille (embosser). The Brailler is similar to a typewriter or computer keyboard. Paper is inserted into the Brailler and multiple keys are pressed at once, creating Braille dots with each press. Through an alternative computer port, newer Braillers can simultaneously act as a speech synthesizer that reads the text displayed on the screen when paired with a screen reading program.

Note Takers

Students may have another student take notes or use an electronic noto-taking device. Portable notetaking devices are small, lightweight devices equipped with a Braille or typewriter-style keyboard for input and synthetic voice. Some note takers also contain a Braille display (between 18 and 40 characters) for output. Note takers are excellent tools for recording notes in school, at home, ot at work. They often have additional features such as a calculator and a calendar function. Newer models have a built-in modem, which allows the user to acess email as well as surf the Web. When theses models are connected to a PC, files can be exchanged or information can be sent from the note taker to a Braille embosser or to an ink printer. When linked to a computer using a screen reader, note takers equipped with a Braille display can act as a Braille output device.

Tape Recorder

A student uses a tape recorder to record class work or test responses rather than writing on paper.

Responding in Test Booklet

This accommodation allows a student to write directly in a test booklet rather than on an answer sheet (e.g., scan-able ŇbubbleÓsheet).

MATERIALS OR DEVICES USED TO SOLVE OR ORGANIZE RESPONSES

Calculation Devices

If a studentŐs disability affects mathematics calculation but not resoning, a calculator or other assistive device (e.g., abacus, arithmetic table, manipulatives, or number chart) may be used. It is important to determine wheter the use of the calculation device is a matter of convenience or a necessary accommodation. It is important to know the goal of instrction an dassessment befor making decisions about the use of calculation devices. For example, if students are learning subtraction with regrouping, using a calculator would not gibe a student an opportunity to show regrouping. On the other hand, if students are learning problem solving skills that include subtraction (e.g., bargain shopping for items with a better value), the use of a calclation device amy be a valid accommodation. Calculators may be adopted with large keys or voice output (talking calculators).  In some cases, an abacus may be useful for students when mathematics problems are to be calculated without a calculator. The abacus functions as paper and pencil for students with visual impairments.

Spelling and Grammar Devices

The use of a dictionary may be allowed on assignments that require an extended response or essay. Spelling and grammar can also be checked with pocket spell checkers. Students enter an approximate spelling and then see or hear the correct spelling or correct use of a word. Students who use a word processor may be allowed to use a spell-check or other electronic spelling device. Some states require spell-check an dgrammar-checking devices to be turned off for writing test.

DESCRIPTION OF RESPONSE ACCOMMODATIONS

Visual Organizers

Visual organizers include graph paper, highlighters, place markers, scratch paper, and templates. Students may not be allowed to write in books owned by the school. Photocopying parts of written text allows a student to use a highlighter and write in the margins.

Graphic Organizers

Graphic organizers help students arrange information into patterns inorder to organize their work and stay focused on the content. Graphic organizers are epecially helpful for writing reports and essays. Semantic mapping software is now available to enable students to understand a narrative story or writing elements through graphics.

Additional ideas that may be helpful:

Student-make personal dictionaries for misspelled words

Multiple-choice questions followed by answer down side with bubbles to the right.

Student points to answers, adult records.

Student writes directly on assessment booklet, adult transfers answers to answer sheet

Use pencil grips and large pencils

 

SETTING accommodations

DESCRIPTION OF SETTING ACCOMMODATIONS

Reduce Distractions to the Student

A setting accommodation to reduce distractions would allow a student to do individual work ot take tests in a different location, usually in a place with few or no other students. Changes may also be made to a studentŐs location within a room. For example, a student who is easily distracted may not want to sit near windows, doors, or pencil sharpeners. Sitting near the teacherŐs desk or in the front of a classroom may be helpful for some studnets. Physically enclosed classrooms (classrooms with four walls) may be more appropriate than open classrooms; study carrels might also be helpful for studnets who are easily distracted. Studnets with low vision may prefer to sit in the part of a room that has the best light. Some studnets concentrate best while wearing noise buffers such as earphones, earplugs, or headphones.

Reduce Distractions to the Student

Some students use accoomodations that may distract other students, such as having a reader or scribe. In addition, some studnets might perform better when they can read and think out loud or make noises that distract other students. Distractions to other students are reduced by using these accommodations in individual settings.

Change Location to Increase Physical Access or to Use Special Equipment

Occasionally a setting might be changed to increase phusical access for a student. For example, a student who uses a wheelchair with a specially designed tabletop and assistive technology may not have adequate space in a auditorium with theater seating, Other students may need equipment that requires specific locations for learing and assessment. For example, a student who uses a computer for word processing might need to complete assignments and take tests in a computer lab. A student who uses large-print materials may need to sit at a table reather than at a desk with a small surface area. Another student might benefit from a standing work station. Keep aisles clear, and do not leave doors or cupboards half open to increase access for students with visual or physical disabilities. Provide space for a guide dog, and explain to other students that the dog is working and should be ignored. Make certain the school is accessible for students with mobility impairments. Studnets should have access to the building, cafeterial, classrooms, media center, restrooms, and playground. Inessence, they should be able to access any room or space on the school grounds used byh studnts in general. Some studnets may need to receive educational services and participate in assessmetns in home or hospital settings.

TIMING AND SCHEDULING accommodations

DESCRIPTION OF TIMING AND SCHEDULING ACCOMMODATIONS

Extended Time

Extended time may require a studentŐs IEP team to determine a fairly specific amount of extra time to complete assignemts, projects, and assessmetns. For timed tests, a standard extension may be time and one half. This means that a student is allowed 90 minutes to take a test that normally has a 60-minute limit. Double time may also be allowed. Decisions should be made on the case-by-case basis, keeping in mind the type of accommodations being provided, the disability involved, and the type of asssignments, assessments, and activities, Usuallly ŇunlimitedÓ time is not appropriate or feasible. Sometimes studnets who request extended time end up not needint it because of the reduction in anxiety of simply knowing that plenty of time is available. Studnts who have too much time may lose interest and motivation to do their best work.

Multiple or Frequent Breaks

Breaks may be given at predetermined intervals or after completion of assignments, tests, or activites. Sometimes a student is allowed to take breaks when individually needed. Sometimes test booklets are divided into shorter sections so students can take a break between sections of a test (sometimes referred toas Ňshort segmetn test bookletsÓ). If the length of a break is predetermined, a timer mihgt be used to signal the end of the break.

Change Schedule or Order of Activities

If possible, schedule assessments and activities that reaquire focused attention at the time of day when a student is most likely to demonstrate peak performance. Sometimes students are allowed to complete activites and take tests over multiple days-completing a portion each day. This is usually done ot reduce fatigue.

EXAMPLES OF accommodations BASED ON STUDENT CHARACTERISTICS

Student Characteristic: Blind, Low Vision, Partial Sight

Category

Accommodations to Consider for Instruction

Accommodations to Consider for Assessments

Presentation

Ÿ       Large print

Ÿ       Magnification devices

Ÿ       Braille

Ÿ       Nemeth Braille code

Ÿ       Tactile graphics

Ÿ       Human reader

Ÿ       Audiotape or compact disk (CD)

Ÿ       Screen reader

Ÿ       Large print or Braille notes, outlines, and instrutions

Ÿ       Descripitve video

Ÿ       Talking materials

Ÿ       Large print

Ÿ       Magnification devices

Ÿ       Braille

Ÿ       Nemeth Braille code

Ÿ       Tactile graphic

Ÿ       Human reader Audiotape or CD

Ÿ       Screen reader

Response

Ÿ       Express response to a scribe through speech

Ÿ       Type on a speak to word processor

Ÿ       Type on Brailler

Ÿ       Speak into tape recorder

Ÿ       Use calculation devices (e.g., talking calculators with enlarged keys, abacus)

Ÿ       Use personal note taker

Ÿ       Express response to a scribe through speech

Ÿ       Type on a speak to word processor

Ÿ       Type on Brailler

Ÿ       Speak into tape recorder

Ÿ       Use calculation devices (e.g., talking calculators with enlarged keys, abacus)

Setting

Ÿ       Change location so student does not distract others

Ÿ       Change location to increase phusical access

Ÿ       Change location to access special equipment

Ÿ       Change location so student does not distract others

Ÿ       Change location to increase phusical access

Ÿ       Change location to access special equipment

Timing and Scheduling

Ÿ       Extended Time

Ÿ       Extended Time

STUDENT CHARACTERISTIC: DEAF, HARD OR HEARING

Category

Accommodations to Consider for Instruction

Accommodations to Consider for Assessments

Presentation

Ÿ       Sign language

Ÿ       Audio amplification devices

Ÿ       Screen reader

Ÿ       Visual cues

Ÿ       Written notes, outlines, and instuctions

Ÿ       Videotape and descriptive video

Ÿ        Provide advanced organizers and outlines of lectures for student to follow

Ÿ       Use gestures (e.g., poing to materials)

Ÿ       Repeat questions and responses form classmates

Ÿ       Allow students to copy notes from classmate

Ÿ       Use captioned versions of instructional films and include script when possible

Ÿ       Give interpreter instructional materials in advance

Ÿ       Learn manual signs and teach them to hearing classmates

Ÿ       Allow students to use telecommunication device

Ÿ       Sign language

Ÿ       Audio amplification devices

Ÿ       Screen reader

Response

Ÿ       Express response to scribe or interpreter

Ÿ       Type on or speak to word processor

Ÿ       Use spelling and grammar assistive devices

Ÿ       Use viual organizers

Ÿ       Use graphic organizers

Ÿ       Express response to scrive or interpreter

Ÿ       Type on or speak to word processor

Ÿ       Use spelling and grammar assistive devices

Ÿ       Use viual organizers

Ÿ       Use graphic organizers

Setting

Ÿ       Change location to reduce distractions

Ÿ       Change location so student does not distract others

Ÿ       Change location to increase physical access (e.g., minimizes background noise, face student when speaking, speaks to student and not to interpreter, and increase wait time for interpreter to finish).

Ÿ       Change location to reduce distractions

Ÿ       Change location so student does not distract others

Ÿ       Change location to increase physical access (e.g., minimizes background noise, face student when speaking, speaks to student and not to interpreter, and increase wait time for interpreter to finish).

STUDENT CHARACTERISTIC: WEAK MANUAL DEXTERITY; DIFFICAULTY WITH PENCIL; DIFFICULTY TYPING ON STANDARD KEYBOARD

Category

Accommodations to Consider for Instruction

Accommodations to Consider for Assessments

Response

Ÿ       Express response to a scribe through speech, pointing or by using an assistive communication device

Ÿ       Type on or speak to word processor

Ÿ       Speak into tape recorder

Ÿ       Use thick pencil or pencil grip

Ÿ       Use written notes, outlines, and instrctions

Ÿ       Express response to a scribe through speech, pointing or by using an assistive communication device

Ÿ       Type on or speak to word processor

Ÿ       Speak into tape recorder

Ÿ       Use thick pencil or pencil grip

STUDENT CHARACTERISTIC: COMMUNICATION DISORDER

Category

Accommodations to Consider for Instruction

Accommodations to Consider for Assessments

Presentation

Ÿ       Screen reader

Ÿ       Screen reader

STUDENT CHARACTERISTIC: READING DISABILITY; DIFFICULTY DECODING

Category

Accommodations to Consider for Instruction

Accommodations to Consider for Assessments

Presentation

Ÿ       Human reader

Ÿ       Audiotape or CD

Ÿ       Screen reader

Ÿ       Videotape

Ÿ       Human reader

Ÿ       Audiotape or CD

Ÿ       Screen reader

Setting

Ÿ       Change locationso student does not distract others

Ÿ       Use written notes, outlines, and instrctions

Ÿ       Change locationso student does not distract others

STUDENT CHARACTERISTIC: WRITING DISABILITY; DIFFICULTY WITH SPELLING

Category

Accommodations to Consider for Instruction

Accommodations to Consider for Assessments

Response

Ÿ       Express response to a scribe through speech

Ÿ       Type on or speak to word processor

Ÿ       Speak into tape recorder

Ÿ       Use spelling and grammar assistive devices(e.g., electronic spelling device, spell check on computer)

Ÿ       Use written notes, outlines, and instructions

Ÿ       Express response to a scribe through speech

Ÿ       Type on or speak to word processor

Ÿ       Speak into tape recorder

Ÿ       Use spelling and grammar assistive devices(e.g., electronic spelling device, spell check on computer)

Student characteristic: mATHEMATICS dISABILITY

Category

Accommodations to Consider for Instruction

Accommodations to Consider for Assessments

Response

Use:

Ÿ       Calculation devices

Ÿ       Visual organizers

Ÿ       Graphic organizers

Ÿ       Math tables and formula sheets

Use:

Ÿ       Calculation devices

Ÿ       Visual organizers

Ÿ       Graphic organizers

STUDENT CHARACTERISTIC: PHYSICAL DISABILITY

Category

Accommodations to Consider for Instruction

Accommodations to Consider for Assessments

Response

Ÿ       Express response to a scribe through speech, pointing, or by using an assistive communication device

Ÿ       Type on or speak to word processor

Ÿ       Speak into tape recorder

Ÿ       Write in test booklet instead of on answer sheet

Ÿ       Use augmentative devices for single or multiple messages (e.g., BIG Mack, Jelly Bean switch, or Dynovox)

Ÿ       Use written notes, outlines, and instuctions

Ÿ       Express response to a scribe through speech, pointing, or by using an assistive communication device

Ÿ       Type on or speak to word processor

Ÿ       Speak into tape recorder

Ÿ       Write in test booklet instead of on answer sheet

Ÿ       Use augmentative devices for single or multiple messages (e.g., BIG Mack, Jelly Bean switch, or Dynovox)

Setting

Ÿ       Change location to increase physical access

Ÿ       Change location to access special equipment

Ÿ       Change location to increase physical access

Ÿ       Change location to access special equipment

Timing and Scheduling

Ÿ       Extended time

Ÿ       Multiple or frequent breaks

Ÿ       Extended time

Ÿ       Multiple or frequent breaks

STUDENT CHACATERISTIC: EASILY DISTRACTED; SHORT ATTENTION SPAN

Category

Accommodations to Consider for Instruction

Accommodations to Consider for Assessments

Presentation

Ÿ       Use books on tape or recorded books to help focus on text

Ÿ       Give short and simple dirctions with examples

 

Response

Ÿ       Write in test booklet instead of on answer sheet

Ÿ       Monitor placement of studnt responses on answer sheet

Ÿ       Use materials or devices used to solve or organize responses

Ÿ       Use visual organizers

Ÿ       Use graphic organizers

Ÿ       Highlight key words in directions

Ÿ       Have studnt repeat and explain directions to check for understanding

Ÿ       Use template

Ÿ       Use graph paper to keep numbers in proper columns

Ÿ       Write in test booklet instead of on answer sheet

Ÿ       Monitor placement of studnt responses on answer sheet

Ÿ       Use materials or devices used to solve or organize responses

Ÿ       Use visual organizers

Ÿ       Use graphic organizers

Ÿ       Highlight key words in directions

Ÿ       Have studnt repeat and explain directions to check for understanding

Ÿ       Use template

Ÿ       Use graph paper to keep numbers in proper columns

Setting

Ÿ       Sit in front of room

Ÿ       Change location to reduce distractions

Ÿ       Sit in front of room

Ÿ       Change location to reduce distractions

Timing and Scheduling

Ÿ       Use short segment test booklets (when available)

Ÿ       Allow for multiple or frequent breaks

Ÿ       Schedule tests in the morning

Ÿ       Cue student to begin working and stay on task

Ÿ       Change testing schedule or order of subtests

Ÿ       Limit reading periods

Ÿ       Schejule activites requiring more seat time in the morning and more hands-on and physical activites in the afternoon

Ÿ       Divide long-term assignments

Ÿ       Use short segment test booklets (when available)

Ÿ       Allow for multiple or frequent breaks

Ÿ       Schedule tests in the morning

Ÿ       Cue student to begin working and stay on task

Ÿ       Change testing schedule or order of subtests