Place Value
Assessments with record sheets and scoring guides

Examples of how to assess student's memory and conceptual understanding of ideas necessary to attain number value literacy. The examples include suggestions, sample scripts, and summary comments or outcomes for the following categories:

Assessments

A summary record sheet can be used to summarize information for each student. Includes categories for yes, no, and comments for each assessment task.

Assessment of [number sense] & [addition and subtraction]

Background information on the development of

Stop any of the individual assessments if a child is not able to respond or responds with random answers.

 

Pre-Place Value
Number sequence to 100, Tens and ones,

Child's Name:

Assessor's Name:

Materials

32 objects, 100 chart puzzle pieces. Two complete 100 chart puzzles, hundred chart with only numbers 1 & 100, and five pieces from a 100 chart.

Directions

Complete 100 chart puzzle:

Ask

Hundred chart with only numbers 1 & 100 and puzzle pieces with one number.

Ask

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Scoring suggestions

Ideas for comments.

Place value
  • Completed with no prompts √
  • Completed with one prompt *
  • Did not complete with one or less prompts -
Comments
100 chart puzzle. There are patterns to the way numbers are sequenced.
Give the child the 100 chart puzzle pieces and ask them to put the puzzle together.
Ask how they knew where the pieces went.    
Give the child an incomplete puzzle piece for a hundred chart (100 chart puzzle ) and ask them place it on a completed 100 chart. If successful, then ask them to complete the piece by saying or writing the missing numbers.
Ask how they knew what number to put into each box.    

 

Multiple Groups

Child's Name:

Assessor's Name:

Materials

32 objects (beans ... )

Directions

Ask

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Scoring suggestions

Ideas for comments.

 
Place value
  • Completed with no prompts √
  • Completed with one prompt *
  • Did not complete with one or less prompts -
Comments
Groupings of ones and tens can be combined in different ways
Place a set of 32 objects onto the table with three groups of ten and one group of two. Ask the child how many objects there are all together. (32)    
How did you know? (counted by ... )    
Ask the child if they can group the objects in a different way. Ask him/her to show you. Ask how they know there are 32. (group by fives, count 5, 10 ... , 31, 32.)    
Ask if they can group them a third way. Ask him/her to show you. Ask how they know there are 32. (group by 2's ... 2, 4, ... 32    

 

Groups of tens and ones
Pre-Place Value
Place values of tens and ones
Conservation of numbers
Unitize

Child's Name:

Assessor's Name:

Materials

27 objects (beans ... ), paper, pencil

Directions

Ask

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Scoring suggestions

Ideas for comments.

Place value
  • Completed with no prompts √
  • Completed with one prompt *
  • Did not complete with one or less prompts -
Comments
Problem 1
Counting a set of 24.
Sets of ten can be pereceived as single entities and used to describe how many.
Give the child a set of 34 objects (substitute name of objects for object when talking to child).
a. Ask how many objects are there? (24)    
b. Ask them to write the numeral for that number. (24)    
c. Ask them how they know. (I counted ... )    
Point to the numeral 4 and ask how many objects that number means, represents, stands for ... (4)    
Then ask what the three means, represents stands for ... (20)
Some children will say 2 and pull aside or point to three objects. When they do, prompt them by asking them what about the rest of the objects. What should you do with them?
   
Problem 2
Making a set of 27.
The position of the digits in numerals determines what they represent and the size group they count.
a. Write the number 27 on a sheet of paper. Ask the child to put that many objects beside the number. (27 objects)
   
Point to the 7 and ask how many objects it represents. (7)    
Ask the student to put that many objects next to the 7. (7)    
b. Point to the two and ask how many objects that number means, represents, stands for ... (20)    
Ask the child to put those objects beside the two. (20)
If the child answers by placing 2 or another number of objects, then prompt by asking. What should you do with them?
   
c. Ask how many objects there are. (27)    

 

Pre-Place Value (set b)
Place values of tens and ones
Conservation of numbers
Unitize

Child's Name:

 

Assessor's Name:

Materials

37 objects (beans ... ), paper, pencil

Directions

Ask

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Scoring suggestions

Ideas for comments.

Place value
  • Completed with no prompts √
  • Completed with one prompt *
  • Did not complete with one or less prompts -
Comments
Problem 1
Counting a set of 37.
Sets of ten can be pereceived as single entities and used to describe how many.
Give the child a set of 37 objects (substitute name of objects for object when talking to child).
a. Ask how many objects are there? (37)    
b. Ask them to write the numeral for that number. (37)    
c. Ask them how they know. (I counted ... )    
Point to the numeral 7 and ask how many objects that number means, represents, stands for ... (7)    
Then ask what the three means, represents stands for ... (30)
Some children will say 3 and show pull aside or point to three objects. When they do, prompt them by asking them what about the rest of the objects. What should you do with them?
   
Problem 2
Making a set of 26.
The position of the digits in numerals determines what they represent and the size group they count.
a. Write the number 26 on a sheet of paper. Ask the child to put that many objects beside the number. (26 objects)
   
Point to the 6 and ask how many objects it represents. (6)    
Ask the student to put that many objects next to the 4. (6)    
b. Point to the two and ask how many objects that number means, represents, stands for ... (20)    
Ask the child to put those objects beside the two. (20)
If the child answers by placing 2 or another number of objects, then prompt by asking. What should you do with them?
   
c. Ask how many objects there are. (26)    

 

Dr. Robert Sweetland's notes
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