Whole Numbers and their Values Assessment information

Examples of how to assess student's rote memory and conceptual understanding of ideas necessary to attain number value literacy. The examples include suggestions, sample scripts, and summary comments or outcomes for the following categories:

Assessments

A summary record sheet can be used to summarize information for each student. Includes categories for yes, no, and comments for each assessment task.

Stop any of the individual assessments if a child is not able to respond or responds with random answers.

Background information on the development of

Assessments for rote counting to 100:

Ask

Stop the child when they stop or appear to not know what number comes next.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Assessments for rote counting by multiples

Ask

Stop the child at 100 or as appropriate.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Ask

Stop the child at 100 or as appropriate.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Ask

Stop the child at 20 or as appropriate.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Ask

Stop the child at 21 or as appropriate.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Assessments for rote counting backwards

Ask

Stop the child at 0.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Ask

Stop the child at 0.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Ask

Stop the child at 0.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Ask

Stop the child at 0.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Ask

Stop the child at 0.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Assessments for rote counting to and from 1 000:

Directions

If you know the student has memorized the sequence of whole numbers from 1-100, then ask the student to count by tens to 100, Then let them count from 100 by ones for awhile to double check. When confident they can, then stop them and tell them you will give them a number and you want them to count from it and you will repeat the process till 1 000. Vary the following numbers as you think necessary. For example, if you know the student has stumbled counting from 60-70, then be sure to stop and start in the 50's to make certain the stumble has been overcome.

Possible stop and start numbers: stop 101, start 125, stop 138; 186, 210; 489, 508; 798, 803; 989, 1 000.

Ask

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Ask

Note and comment suggestions:

Numeral recognition

Materials

Random number sheets

Ask

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Repeat the same procedure for the next number sheet. 12, 17, 19, 16, 18, 13, 15, 11, 14, 20

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Correctly forms numerals

Materials

Writing implement and paper.

Ask

Numbers need to be made from top to bottom and left to right. The following rhymes can be used to help students memorize the patterns for numeral writing.

  1. A line down one is fun.
  2. Around and back on a railroad track; two, two, two.
  3. Around a tree, around a tree, that is how we make a three.
  4. Down and over and down some more, that is how we make a four.
  5. Fat old five goes down and around, put a flag on top and see what we've found.
  6. Down to a loop, a six rolls a loop.
  7. Across the sky and down low you're headen, that is how we make a seven.
  8. Make a S, do not wait, come back up and make an eight.
  9. A loop and a line make number nine.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Subitizing Instant recognition

Materials

Directions

For each number randomly arrange a group of that many objects. Keep them hidden from the student. Tell the student you will show them a group of objects for a short period of time (2 seconds) and you want them to guess or tell you the number of objects.

Display objects arranged randomly on a tray or mat.

Ask

How many objects do you think are in the group.

Child must instantly (2 seconds) tell the number of objects in a group.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Assessment for One-to-one correspondence or synchrony

Materials

Objects or beans to make groups or 4, 8, 12, and 24.

Directions

Put 3 groups of beans on a work mat:

  1. Counts a group of 4,
  2. Counts a group of 8, and
  3. Counts a group of 12.

Ask

The child to count a group of beans. If the child counts 12 comfortably then move all the beans together (24) and ask them to count the larger group. If the child can't count the chosen group, then ask the child to count a smaller group.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

 Assessment for One-to-one correspondence with matching

Materials

Dot pattern cards or dot plates, collection of 12 objects or beans, cup, plate or mat

Directions

Show students a pattern of six. Give them a collection of at least 12 objects in a cup and a plate or mat placed beside the dot pattern.

Ask

The student to put as many objects on the plate as there are dots on the card.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Cardinality match subitizing or visual pattern recognition

Materials

Two sets of Dot pattern cards

Directions

Give students two sets of dot cards 1-9.

Ask

Match the cards.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Number Value (More, Less, and Same)

Materials

Two sets of Dot pattern cards (1-10).

Directions

Divide the cards into two piles. Have the student and teacher turn a card over.

Ask

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Hierarcial inclusion for five

Materials

Five objects, cup,

Directions

Put five objects in a cup. Ask the student if they could use the objects in the cup to show someone what four objects would look like.

Ask

What other numbers could you show a person using the objects in the cup.

Dump the objects out and place the empty cup in front of the student.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

Cardinality match numeral and number word

Materials

Two sets of cards. Dot pattern cards, numeral cards, number word cards

Directions

Give students two sets of dot cards 1-9.

Ask

Match the cards.

Notes, comments, and suggestions

 

[Additional assessment materials: Place value and operations of addition and subtraction]

 

Dr. Robert Sweetland's notes
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