Sketch Activity for Picture Books
Sample - Crow Boy

The purpose for answering the following questions is to focus your thinking on story telling as a process of communication of conceptual and emotional understanding as opposed to a process of word selection and composition of phrases and sentences. Future links from this activity will be to implications on what philosophical understandings best fit this type of activity, for what type of learning and what type of pedagogy would be necessary. (illustrations and critique for the book Crow Boy.)

Directions Read an illustrated picture book, (on reserve in Conn library is - Crow Boy by Taro Yashima) and do the following tasks.

1. Select one of the feelings from the story. Determine a name for that feeling.

  • Explain why that feeling was selected.
  • Explain how the story communicates that feeling.
  • Describe where in the story that information is found.

2. Identify other feelings that could have been selected.

  • Explain why that feeling was selected.
  • Explain how the story communicates that feeling.
  • Describe where in the story that information is found.

3. Select a color, shape, or line(s) that might communicate that feeling. [Black, blue, midnight blue; half-circle (setting sun) tear drop; happiness blue sky, grass green.]

Explain how that color, shape, or line(s) might communicate that feeling.

4. Identify other colors, shapes, or lines that might communicate that feeling.

Explain how that color, shape, or line(s) might communicate that feeling

5. Describe where in your life or other people's lives this story would make sense to them.

Describe where in the story you found your idea(s).

6. Draw a sketch for the story and explain how it relates to the story. Be creative, invent new ways of interpretation. (No excuses or comments about ones ability to draw or sketch allowed. --- Sponge Bob Square Pants --- A sketch or drawing no matter how it's drawn can communicate more than a picture or masterpiece by the greatest artist.)

7. Share what you learned with your group.

8. Explain the merits and concerns with this type of activity to promote a productive literary talk?

Source- Whitin, Phyllis (2002) Leading into Literature Circles through the Sketch-to-stretch Strategy The Reading Teacher, Feb. 2002 v55 i5 p444(7)